Acid Diaper Rash: Treatment for Acid Butt Burn 15


acid diaper rashAfter three boys, I thought I’d seen all a butt could turn out—from poop paintings to corn kernels—but when my fourth baby started getting weird acidic poop that literally seemed to eat her skin away, I was sort of baffled. Acid diaper rash was not something I had heard a lot about, but it happens, and it is horrible.

So, what exactly is acid diaper rash and how do you spot it?

Acid diaper rash occurs when for one reason or another your baby’s poop becomes acidic and literally burns the skin. For my baby, this was obvious by immediate bleeding rashes (when I knew she had just pooped). These bloody spots almost looked like she’d been poked repeatedly with a small pin and were only where the poop had touched.

Other types of diaper rash occur more frequently where the diaper touches or in skin creases, but this rash will be very red, possibly bleeding, inflamed skin only where the poop is touching, and it will be there no matter how quickly you change the diaper. I think that’s the biggest tell that a rash is acid-based, it happens almost instantly.

Next, the poop that accompanies acid diaper rash is often runny and looks poorly digested, like there are often still recognizable chunks of lunch. In babies that haven’t started solid foods, it just looks very runny and lacks the common seedy appearance. It may also have an off odor, that just doesn’t smell like just poop, almost rancid.

What causes acid diaper rash or acidic poop?

Some babies can get acidic poop from high fruit intake or foods that are high in acid themselves such as tomato, but in my baby girl’s case, it was fructose sensitivity. It can take some diet exploration to pinpoint the cause of acidic poop, but it is almost always a dietary cause.

One of the easiest ways to track a food allergy or sensitivity is to keep a diet log. Note days the rash or acid poop occur and find common factors, then cut one factor at a time to see what works. As fructose sensitivity is a common culprit of acid diaper rash, I caution that not all fruit will get a reaction (bananas for instance are fine) and remember that high fructose corn syrup will also create an issue (“high fructose”).

How do you treat acid poop burns?

In this case, the most important thing is to identify the dietary issue causing the rash and eliminate it. The burns actually heal quite quickly as long as the acid poops stop. In the meantime, it can help to avoid baby wipes by using either a small squirt bottle or just a quick butt rinse in the tub. As it’s the wiping motion that tends to hurt, just dab dry afterwards.

The best diaper rash cream I found for this was the Triple Paste, though I would avoid applying anything but fresh air until the burns are no longer actively weeping. They, at least if your baby is changed quickly, are usually not very severe and it takes less than a day for the rash to look kind of scaly and red (this is like a thin scab over the burn) at that point it’s ok to use the cream and it will help things heal faster.

Like what you see? Give us a share.
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on YummlyShare on RedditShare on StumbleUponEmail this to someone

In an effort to slay the spam monster and ensure no comment gets left unread, your comments are moderated and won't appear until approved. Sorry about that, and thanks for reading!

15 thoughts on “Acid Diaper Rash: Treatment for Acid Butt Burn

  • Gileanne

    my son gets butt burn/rash when he has any type of fruit (even with bananas!) and tomato paste.. there are this organic curlz that have apple powder stated in their ingredients, will it burn him as well or apple powder is not acidic as the fruit/puree?

    • unwirklich admin

      I really don’t know, if even banana gets him I’m not sure it’s the fructose giving him trouble..if it isn’t the fructose, he may do fine with the apple powder because it is more processed.

  • Brandy Alterman

    Did you seek any sort of GI consult for this?
    I have a 8 week old, and we have been fighting an acid rash for the last 6 weeks. She has some acid reflux and we have switched to Alimentum. We (dad/I and the doctor), have tried everything– from OTC creams, Silvadene burn cream, baking soda soaks, a compound acid binding cream, blow drying each diaper change, etc. We are now to the GI consult because her pediatrician (who is absolutely wonderful and has made this his mission to figure out) is out of options. I’m not quite sure what to expect, and found this read at the perfect time.

    • unwirklich admin

      I didn’t, my pediatrician actually couldn’t figure out why she had been losing weight while breastfeeding (despite ample supply/good latch) and had the rash/diarrhea. I made the connection through trial and error by keeping a food diary, then confirmed with just my regular doctor.

  • Karrie

    Did (does) your 4th baby have a blue vein in between her eyes? My child with this rash did. He also had some problems with some of his teeth starting to decay. These babies are called “sugar babies” and they are sensitive to sugar. It’s an eastern medicine kind of thing. Fascinating. I just found your post tonight after trying to figure out what’s with this poop and terrible rash and why he gets it sooo much worse than his brothers had. And as soon as I read fructose sensitivity it all came crashing back. Time to become thoroughly well read on this topic. Thanks so much for this post!

    • unwirklich admin

      No, she doesn’t have a vein. Fructose sensitivity is just a result of an immature digestive system. My daughter is now just over 18 months and as almost outgrown it. When she was 6 months any fruit, any at all, whether it was 1 raisin or a full cup of juice, gave her a horrible rash and diarrhea, now she can even drink apple juice (which is the worst one). It only seems to be a problem at this point if she has a ton of fruit in one day, say, like multiple cups of apple juice. My pediatrician said that’s fairly normal, for kids to outgrow fructose intolerance by age 2.

      • Gileanne

        My son has had it since 6months when he started eating fruit purees. He is currently 12 months. I can’t even give him fruit/veggie mix pouches as it burns his butt quickly. Also pouches with tomato paste make his butt burn.. do you know if quinoa is also acidic? I think the times i’ve given him a pouch with quinoa his butt tends to become red (although not as bad as with fruits/tomato paste). It’s so hard because even the snacks they sell all contain some sort of fruit powder/ juice concentrate and I’m even scared to try those.. Do you know if these snacks that contain say, apple powder or some sort of juice concentrate in their ingredients, can also contribute to butt rash? Dr recommended EPC cream (Extra Protective Cream from Secura sold via Amazon) and it helps clear it out.. Glad to know he should outgrow it in a couple of months!

        • unwirklich admin

          Quinoa is a grain, it isn’t acidic no, and though it does contain some fructose I think it’s balanced much like bananas and shouldn’t be causing an issue if fructose is really what’s behind the rash. Are the poops super runny, frothy, or seem poorly digested? They’ll also smell really bad and sort of sweet (like fruit). With our daughter she even had trouble breastfeeding if I had eaten fruit, so I’m wondering if maybe it isn’t another ingredient in your purees, will straight, like from the peel banana do it?

    • Ashley

      My son has had acidic poop since he was a few weeks old (we call this fire tush at this point) and he turns 2 later this month. Early on we had breastfeeding and feeding issues in general – turned out he had a corn sensitivity (in all powder formula) and we were fine until 10 months old when he started daycare. Long story short, teething was the noticeable cause and we outgrew some of the corn sensitivity (only avoided straight corn).

      Now fire tush is back. And has been for 7 weeks no matter what we do (creams, oatmeal baths, air, no diaper wipes, etc) or who we see (pediatricians, specialists, etc).

      I suppose I’m seeking a follow up. How is you daughter today? Was it natural and artificial fructose intolerance? Best courses of treatment that you found?

      • unwirklich admin

        She could not have fructose of any kind, which made things very hard, they put high fructose corn syrup in more than you’d think. She is about 18 months now and she has pretty much completely outgrown it. She’ll still get a but of rash if she has a lot of high fructose foods (like multiple cups of apple juice for example) but it’s nothing like it was when she was younger. In the case of fructose, our pediatrician told us most kids outgrow it by age 2 because it’s not an allergy, it’s an intolerance as a result of an underdeveloped digestive system. I’m not sure if a corn sensitivity would work the same way, but if you’ve been told it isn’t a true allergy, I’d bet so.

        • Amber

          My son has this same problem. When he gets it really bad, I sometimes give him baby Advil or baby Tylenol. His father asked if its really needed. What are your thoughts? I don’t think it is a big deal. He is clearly in pain.

          • unwirklich admin

            I agree, if it is obviously hurting him there’s no issue with a little pain reliever as long as it doesn’t become a chronic thing. Daily use for instance of Tylenol is very hard on the liver and kidneys.

    • Teresa

      Hi Karrie! My 6 month old son just got his first terrible butt rash tonight.. it’s been because he has pooped 7 times today 🙁 We didn’t introduce any new foods, he’s eating all purees that he has had before, plus formula, so I am hesitant to think ours is food-related, but I am curious more about the blue vein in between the eyes. My son has that. Did you change your child’s diet, and did the blue vein go away?