Circumcision: Why I Choose to Circumcise My Sons 11


All three of my sons were circumcised. If the baby I’m currently pregnant with is male, he, too, will be. I’ve received some flack over that. It seems anti-circumcision has become a big topic these days. What once was perfectly acceptable will now get you called a mutilator by some. Personally, I’m not pro or against circumcision. I just chose to circumcise. I stand by my decision to have my kids circumcised. This is why.

Studies DO support it.

While lots of people may argue this one, there is a rather lengthy list of studies that support the medical benefits of circumcision. Those include a reduced risk of urinary infections, penile cancer, and sexually transmitted diseases such as HIV. Both the CDC and the American Academy of Pediatrics confirm these findings even though they do not take a firm stance on whether or not parents should circumcise their sons. Please do not try to refute these reputable sources with biased sites.

It is easier to care for.

In my personal opinion, having cared for children who were and were not circumcised, circumcised infants are easier to clean down there. This one is strictly my opinion; of course, as few studies have been done on the subject, but I do feel, hygiene-wise, it’s a cleaner option. I’m sure many have a different view on the subject. If you’re trying to decide, maybe do some baby sitting and get some experience caring for both options.

They won’t feel different.

While circumcision rates have dropped according to the CDC in the last few years, and were only at 54.7% in 2010, the “norm” is still circumcision in my area. The drop is actually suggested to be a result of some states no longer covering circumcisions through public healthcare programs such as Medicaid. Honestly, no matter what sex those may be that are reading this article, what do you picture when you think of a penis? Whatever you saw, that’s probably the cultural norm for you. My husband is circumcised. All my kid’s cousins and friends are circumcised. I don’t want my kids to grow up and feel self-conscious sexually, because they look different. The tables may be opposite for you, but they aren’t for our family.

There aren’t sufficient risks.

The above is not outweighed by the nearly non-existent risks of circumcision. Naturally, the fact that there isn’t a reason not to, does weigh in on my decision to do so. There are just as many minor complications that can arise in an uncircumcised newborn as a circumcised one.

Again, I believe that circumcision is a personal-choice issue for parents where there isn’t necessarily a right or wrong decision. Some would argue the decision should be the child’s, but how many decisions do you make a day for your child that are irreversible? Thousands if not more? The food they eat, the things they learn, the environment they live in, the medical care they receive — that is your job. You are a parent and you make decisions that affect your child’s health and life every single day; to circumcise or not, is just another one of those decisions. Please stop trying to make me feel bad for my decision for my children, as I’ve never looked down on yours.

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iliterati

Why is it that all the stories about people circumcising their babies seem to be from women and those opposed from men?
I long for the day when this barbarous mutilation of male babies is banned in all but for the rare serious occasion of deformity or extreme need.

Ash

My statistics come from the countries that don’t circumcise, as in the other 80% of the world. You’re welcome to look up information from places outside of your Little world. I recommend starting with looking up an article called “when bad science kills” and reading not only it but all the sources cited on it.

Heidi

I’m interested in seeing the “thousands” of studies showing the benefits of circumcision….

Ash

If you found intact boys hard to clean chances are you were doing it wrong. Never retract a child’s foreskin, wipe the outside like you would a finger. And if a 1/11,000 risk of DEATH and 1/500 permanent botch rate isn’t an important enough risk to not have a part of someone’s body cut off without immediate need, you need your priorities checked.